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RESPECT

Overview For Teachers

RESPECT: The ability to acknowledge and appreciate the opinions, property, and rights of others; value diversity and cultural differences; respond appropriately to those in authority; respond to feedback unemotionally and nondefensively; the ability to negotiate diplomatic solutions to interpersonal and workplace issues; acknowledge the economic, political, and social relationships that impact multiple levels of an organization; the ability to intervene when others demonstrate negative attitudes or disrespect and help them recognize the inappropriateness of their behavior.

PURPOSE: Upon completion of this module, the student will understand the importance of respect in the classroom as well as the workplace. In addition, the objectives listed below should be met.

OBJECTIVES:

 Ability to understand the importance of respect

 Ability to respect themselves, others, and their surroundings

 Ability to understand the consequences of being disrespectful

OVERVIEW:

This module concentrates on teaching students to recognize and portray self-respect as well as respect for others and their surroundings. Students should understand that respect play s a huge role in being successful in all aspects of life. Showing respect to authority figures as well as family and friends says a lot about a person’s character and values. In this module, the participant will have an opportunity to gain an understanding of the importance of respect by participating in various activities designed to stimulate thought and discussion.

TEACHERS: WHAT ARE YOU OBSERVING?

What does respect look like in the classroom or in school in general? A great way to answer this and get things going is through engagement with the students. Ask your students these questions:

1. What does respect look like in class?

2. How does your respect affect others? Example: Respect of space, not entering another student’s locker.

3. What does respect look like within your learning?

RELEVANCY OF RESPECT:

Being respectful is a key characteristic in building positive relationships.

LESSON:

Criticism-Constructive or Not?
Time Allocation: 20  minutes
Materials/Resources: paper, pens/ pencils, computers/ tablets/ smartphones (students - optional), whiteboard, markers


ANTICIPATORY SET IDEA:

 Ask students to define the word Criticism – what does it mean to them?

 Next, ask students to define Constructive Criticism or have them explain the different between criticism and constructive criticism

     o Criticism: the expression of disapproval of someone or something based on faults or mistakes

     o Constructive Criticism: offers helpful and specific suggestions for positive changes

WATCH THE VIDEO:


DIRECT INSTRUCTION:

 Inform students that there is an obvious difference between criticism and constructive criticism – one is hurtful and one is helpful.

 Give each student a piece of paper and pen/ pencil.

 Write the following writing prompt on the whiteboard and read it aloud to the class as well.

     o Think about a time when you were criticized by a parent, teacher, coach, family member, or friend.

 What words did they use?  How did those words make you feel?

 How did you handle what was said?

 How could the same message have been delivered in a more positive, productive way?

 Students will respond to the prompt individually.


GUIDED ACTIVITY:

 When students finish, put them into groups of three and have them share their response s to the prompt with their group members.  Ask students to provide feedback and advice to their group members on how constructive criticism could have been offered in each situation rather than criticism.

 When groups are done sharing and giving feedback, have a few groups report out what they discussed and a few of the situations they have experienced.


CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING:

 Technology Use: Create a survey, poll, or questionnaire to send to the students that will give you immediate feedback about the student’s level of understanding (Survey Monkey, Google Forms, Edmodo, etc.).

 Non-Technology: Fist to Five: Student will rate their understanding using their hands from a fist or 0 which would mean they don’t understand at all to a five which means they could teach the concept to other students if necessary.

ETHICAL SCENARIO--Optional (if not using, skip  to "review and closing")

The Ethical Choice Scenarios have been developed to provide teachers with the ability to make the material applicable to real-life and relevant to the students. Within this guide, directions and prompts for the teacher will be in BLUE for ease of facilitation.

 

READ THE FOLLOWING SCENARIO OUT LOUD TO THE STUDENTS: 

DON’T MIND US!

It’s Friday night and so far, it’s going to be a night to remember. You just finished cheering for your school at the Homecoming football game where you beat your school rival 56 -17 and everyone is very excited. You and your friends decide to go to the local diner to grab some food since you are all starving. Your group is fairly large so when you arrive at the diner, the hostess has to push a few tables together to accommodate everyone in your group. Your group sits down at the table and they all start breaking off into their own conversations. Two of your friends are debating on where they should go to dinner before the Homecoming dance tomorrow night, three friends are arguing about the game and how many bad calls the referees made, and three of your friends are wading up pieces of paper napkin and shooting spit balls back and forth at each other. All of the other customers in the restaurant glance over at your table in disgust, and some even get up and leave. Finally, the food you order comes and everyone calms down a bit to eat. You have no idea what time it is so you pull out your phone and see that it’s already past 10:30 pm – the restaurant usually closes at 10 pm so they have specifically stayed open late to accommodate your group. Knowing this, you urge everyone to finish and to pay their bill so the employees can start closing for the night. Luckily, the group listens to you and everyone’s bill is paid within a matter of minutes. The group gets up to leave and you realize what a mess everyone has made – there’s food, trash, and spit balls all over the floor, one of your friends spilled his chocolate milkshake and didn’t even attempt to clean it up and on top of all of that, no one decided to leave a tip for the waitress. As you walk out of the restaurant, you can’t help but feel like you and your group acted very disrespectfully to not only the other customers and the employees, but also to the restaurant as a whole. So, what do you do? Do you walk back into the restaurant and apologize for your group’s behavior? Do you force all your friends back into the restaurant so you can all apologize together? Or do you let it go since it doesn’t seem to be a big concern for anyone else in the group?


ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: (display them to the class if necessary)

1. How many of you have already been faced with this scenario in real life?

2. What would be the reaction of your friends if you suggested going back to apologize?

3. What are possible positive or negative consequences, depending on your decision?


GUIDED DISCUSSION: ASK STUDENTS TO SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS ON THE SITUATION AND HOW THEY ANSWERED THE QUESTIONS.

NOTE 1 : To help facilitate discussion, share any personal experiences you may have encountered with this same sort of issue.

NOTE 2 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students, “ Would you want a group to behave this way if you were the server?”

NOTE 3 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students , “ What values do you think are in tension here, why is it an ethical dilemma?”


CLOSING DISCUSSION: ASK THE STUDENTS , “ HOW DOES THIS SITUATION ADDRESS THE ISSUE OF SELF-RESPECT , AS WELL AS THE IMPORTANCE OF RESPECTING OTHERS?”


REVIEW AND CLOSING:

 Share the following quote with the class and have a short class discussion about what it means.

     o “The trouble with most of us is that we would rather be ruined by praise than saved by criticism.” – Norman Vincent Peale

CORRELATION TO OBSERVATION TOOL: The Frequency Observation Tool (FOT) has a category where stude nts will be observed and rated on their ability to take feedback/ criticism unemotionally. This lesson will give students the opportunity to see why feedback and constructive criticism are important and how they can help them grow and succeed.


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION IDEAS:

-Visual: Visual learners will benefit from having the writing prompt displayed on the whiteboard so they can refer back to it when necessary.

-Auditory: Auditory learners will benefit from having the writing prompt read aloud as well as the group and class discussions.

-Kinesthetic: Kinesthetic learners would benefit from having the option to move about the classroom as they think. They will also benefit from the writing activity.

-ESL: ESL students would benefit from having a partner to assist them in the writing activity in case they have questions or need clarification.

-At-risk: At -risk students will benefit from the interaction they have with their group to help keep them focused and on task.

-Advanced: Advanced learners could benefit from helping other students write down their schedules, or by assisting ESL or At -risk students who may need additional help .

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