top of page

FLEXIBILITY

Overview For Teachers

FLEXIBILITY: The ability to adapt; display a teachable heart and willingness to change or compromise; to be receptive to new information; the ability to learn from mistakes for the benefit of self and the employer.

PURPOSE: Upon completion of this module, the student will understand the importance of flexibility and the role it plays in their future success in life . In addition, the objectives listed below should be met.

OBJECTIVES:

 Ability to understand the importance of being flexible in life

 Ability to become a lifelong learner

 Ability to change and compromise with others

 Ability to learn from their mistakes

OVERVIEW:

This module focuses on teaching students the importance of being flexible . Students will work to improve these skills through activities and guided discussions with their class . They will discuss topics such as being flexible in the workplace, the importance of adapting at work, learning from their mistakes and being a lifelong learner.

TEACHERS: WHAT ARE YOU OBSERVING?

What does Flexibility look like in the classroom or in school in general? A great way to answer this and get things going is through engagement with the students. Ask your students these questions:

1. What does flexibility look like in school?

2. How does your flexibility affect people around you? Example: teachers, classmates, family, etc.

3. What does flexibility look like within your learning?

RELEVANCY OF FLEXIBILITY:

Employers are actively seeking out individuals who are flexible to changing circumstances and environments, who embrace new ideas, and who are resourceful and adaptable. Being flexible is one of the top characteristics employers are looking for in new employees.

LESSON:

Why You Should Seek Failure
Time Allocation: 20-30  minutes
Materials/Resources: computer with internet access / projector (teacher), pens/ pencils , Happy Fails Worksheet., whiteboard, markers


ANTICIPATORY SET IDEA:

 Write the following quote on the whiteboard so students can read it as they enter the classroom :

    o “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.” – Henry Ford

 Ask students the following questions:

    o What does it mean to fail?

    o What does failure look like?

    o What does it mean when you fail at something?

    o What can you learn from failure?

WATCH THE VIDEO:


DIRECT INSTRUCTION:

 Show students the following Ted Talk on “Seeking Failure.” Since the video is a little over 17 minutes long ; please be sure to preview it. It is a good video – so you may want to allow extra time to show the whole thing.

 Ask students the following questions for a short class discussion:

    o What does it mean to seek failure? o How can this make you grow as an individual?

    o What is a “happy fail?”  Seeking failure means to push yourself so hard in a task or towards a goal that you almost reach your breaking point. In the video, Adam Kreek quotes fellow Olympic medalist and teammate Jake Wetzel as saying, “The greatest point of growth occurs right below your limit.” Seeking failure is knowing your limits and reaching beyond that limit to grow as an individual whether you succeed or not.


GUIDED ACTIVITY:

 Have students work independently to complete the Happy Fails Worksheet.

 When they finish, have them find a partner or make groups of 3 to share their self-reflection with other students.

 This time will be used for students to offer feedback to their classmates on how to look at the positive side of their failures to turn them into “happy fails.”

 When a few minutes are left in class, ask for volunteers to share their self -reflection with the class and also how they turned this failure into a happy fail.


CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING:

 Technology Use: You could create a Kahoot ( Kahoot.com) which is an interactive game that students can log into from the ir computers or smart phones and it will give you instant feedback.

 Non-Technology: Thumbs Up/ Thumbs Down: Students will rate their current level of understanding by giving either a thumbs up or a thumbs down.

ETHICAL SCENARIO--Optional (if not using, skip  to "review and closing")

The Ethical Choice Scenarios have been developed to provide teachers with the ability to make the material applicable to real-life and relevant to the students. Within this guide, directions and prompts for the teacher will be in BLUE for ease of facilitation.

 

READ THE FOLLOWING SCENARIO OUT LOUD TO THE STUDENTS: 

DRIVE THE GROUP?

You’ve been assigned to a group project in your health class on different methods people can use to make unhealthy meals healthier . You aren’t really friends with any of the other students who have been assigned to your group but you hope you will get along with all of them and you will be able to work well together. It’s the first day of group work . You sit down at the table with your group and you are excited to share your i deas for the project. You did some research ahead of time in hopes they would all agree with what you plan to propose and then your group would be a step ahead of the others . You immediately start sharing your research and ideas but everyone in the group disagrees with you and they all start talking about their own ideas and how they would work better. You are a little surprised at all the pushback you are receiving and in that moment, you are worried about how you are going to get the group to work togethe r as a team. Everyone in the group thinks their idea is the best and everyone wants to be the leader – how is this going to work? What can you do to start getting the group to agree and on the right track to start the project? Should you continue to push your ideas on the group or should you start compromising with your group members?


ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: (display them to the class if necessary)

1. How many of you have already been faced with this scenario in real life?

2. What are the possible positive outcomes of this situation?

3. What are possible positive or negative consequences for you, depending on your decision?

4. What are possible positive or negative consequences for your group, depending on your decision?


GUIDED DISCUSSION: ASK STUDENTS TO SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS ON THE SITUATION AND HOW THEY
ANSWERED THE QUESTIONS.

NOTE 1 : To help facilitate discussion, share any personal experiences you may have encountered with this same sort of issue.

NOTE 2 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students , “ What does it mean to be flexible when working with a group ? Does being flexible mean you always have to ‘give in’?”

NOTE 3 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students , “ W hat values do you think are in tension here, why is it an ethical dilemma?”


CLOSING DISCUSSION: ASK THE STUDENT , “ WHAT IMPACTS COULD YOUR DECISION HAVE ON YOUR GROUP’S SUCCESS ?”



REVIEW AND CLOSING:

To end the lesson, ask students to pair share a goal they currently have for themselves and the steps they are taking to reach this goal. If time allows, ask for volunteers to share their goal with the class.

 

CORRELATION TO OBSERVATION TOOL: The Frequency Observation Tool (FOT) has a category where students will be observed and rated on their ability to learn from their mistakes. This lesson will give students the opportunity to reflect on a past failure and come up with ways to make it a happy fail and how to use this past failure to help them in the future.


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION IDEAS
-Visual: Visual learners will benefit from having a printed copy of the worksheet and having any important information written on the whiteboard. They will also benefit from watching the video.

-Auditory: Auditory learners will benefit from receiving feedback from their partner as well as the class discussions. They will also benefit from listening to the video.

-Kinesthetic:Kinesthetic learners would benefit from creating a chart or diagram in response to the reflection. Rather than writing down their answers, they could create a diagram or web map to plan out future goals and how to achieve them.

-ESL: ESL students will benefit from working with a partner and receiving feedback in case they have questions or need clarification.

-At-risk: At -risk students will benefit from the constant interactions with their partner and the class. This will help keep them focused and engaged. 

-Advanced: Advanced learners could benefit from this lesson by assisting students who rate their current level of understanding at a low level. They could work with them and help them further understand the lesson and try to answer any questions they have.

Start Here

bottom of page