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FLEXIBILITY

Overview For Teachers

FLEXIBILITY: The ability to adapt; display a teachable heart and willingness to change or compromise; to be receptive to new information; the ability to learn from mistakes for the benefit of self and the employer.

PURPOSE: Upon completion of this module, the student will understand the importance of flexibility and the role it plays in their future success in life . In addition, the objectives listed below should be met.

OBJECTIVES:

 Ability to understand the importance of being flexible in life

 Ability to become a lifelong learner

 Ability to change and compromise with others

 Ability to learn from their mistakes

OVERVIEW:

This module focuses on teaching students the importance of being flexible . Students will work to improve these skills through activities and guided discussions with their class . They will discuss topics such as being flexible in the workplace, the importance of adapting at work, learning from their mistakes and being a lifelong learner.

TEACHERS: WHAT ARE YOU OBSERVING?

What does Flexibility look like in the classroom or in school in general? A great way to answer this and get things going is through engagement with the students. Ask your students these questions:

1. What does flexibility look like in school?

2. How does your flexibility affect people around you? Example: teachers, classmates, family, etc.

3. What does flexibility look like within your learning?

RELEVANCY OF FLEXIBILITY:

Employers are actively seeking out individuals who are flexible to changing circumstances and environments , who embrace new ideas, and who are resourceful and adaptable. Being flexible is one of the top characteristics employers are looking for in new employees.

LESSON:

Learning to Compromise through Role Play
Time Allocation: 20 minutes
Materials/Resources: chart paper, markers, paper, pens/ pencils , computers / tablets/ smartphones ( students - optional)

 

WATCH THE VIDEO:


ANTICIPATORY SET IDEA:

 Ask students the following questions:

    o When you were little and got into an argument with one of your siblings or friends , especially over something like a toy that both of you wanted to play with , what did your parents always tell you do to solve the problem?

 Answer: share or compromise

    o Why did your parents want you to do this? What would this solve?

    o Does compromise mean “just giving in”?


DIRECT INSTRUCTION:

 Put students into groups of 3 and ask students to think about all the different conflicts they could have at work, at school , or at home. These could be made up conflicts of even personal examples of conflicts.

 Give each group a piece of chart paper and have them write down all the conflicts they can think of.

 After a few minutes, have the groups stop writing and then ask them to circle the three most challenging conflicts they have on their list.

 After they choose their top three, go around the room and have each group share their top 3 with the rest of the class.


GUIDED ACTIVITY:

 Keep students in the same groups and now tell them they are to choose one of their top three conflicts from their list to create a role play to present to the class. They must following these rules in creating their role play:

    o Everyone in the group must be included

    o The role play must be short and to the point – no more than a few minutes long

    o It must include the conflict as well as the compromise/ solution

    o Remind students of the definition of compromise:

          “An agreement or a settlement of a dispute that is reached by each side making concessions .” Source: Google search – compromise definition.


CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING:

 Technology Use: Obsurvery: Create a survey, poll, or questionnaire to send to the students that will give you immediate feedback about the student’s level of understanding.

 Non-Technology: Use: 3 -2 -1: Students will reflect on the lesson and on a piece of paper they will write down 3 things they learned, 2 things they want to know more about , and 1 questions they have.

ETHICAL SCENARIO--Optional (if not using, skip  to "review and closing")

The Ethical Choice Scenarios have been developed to provide teachers with the ability to make the material applicable to real-life and relevant to the students. Within this guide, directions and prompts for the teacher will be in BLUE for ease of facilitation.

 

READ THE FOLLOWING SCENARIO OUT LOUD TO THE STUDENTS: 

DRIVE THE GROUP?

You’ve been assigned to a group project in your health class on different methods people can use to make unhealthy meals healthier . You aren’t really friends with any of the other students who have been assigned to your group but you hope you will get along with all of them and you will be able to work well together. It’s the first day of group work . You sit down at the table with your group and you are excited to share your i deas for the project. You did some research ahead of time in hopes they would all agree with what you plan to propose and then your group would be a step ahead of the others . You immediately start sharing your research and ideas but everyone in the group disagrees with you and they all start talking about their own ideas and how they would work better. You are a little surprised at all the pushback you are receiving and in that moment, you are worried about how you are going to get the group to work togethe r as a team. Everyone in the group thinks their idea is the best and everyone wants to be the leader – how is this going to work? What can you do to start getting the group to agree and on the right track to start the project? Should you continue to push your ideas on the group or should you start compromising with your group members?


ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: (display them to the class if necessary)

1. How many of you have already been faced with this scenario in real life?

2. What are the possible positive outcomes of this situation?

3. What are possible positive or negative consequences for you, depending on your decision?

4. What are possible positive or negative consequences for your group, depending on your decision?


GUIDED DISCUSSION: ASK STUDENTS TO SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS ON THE SITUATION AND HOW THEY
ANSWERED THE QUESTIONS.

NOTE 1 : To help facilitate discussion, share any personal experiences you may have encountered with this same sort of issue.

NOTE 2 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students , “ What does it mean to be flexible when working with a group ? Does being flexible mean you always have to ‘give in’?”

NOTE 3 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students , “ What values do you think are in tension here, why is it an ethical dilemma?”


CLOSING DISCUSSION: ASK THE STUDENT , “ WHAT IMPACTS COULD YOUR DECISION HAVE ON YOUR GROUP’S SUCCESS ?”

REVIEW AND CLOSING:

 Ask the following questions as a closing to the lesson.

    o Why is it important to compromise ?

    o How can compromising solve problems? o Is there ever a time that you shouldn’t compromise?

    o How does compromising impact others?

 

CORRELATION TO OBSERVATION TOOL: The Frequency Observation Tool (FOT) has a category where students will be observed and rated on their ability to compromise. This lesson will give students the opportunity to be put in real -life scenarios where making a compromise is necessary to solve the problem.


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION IDEAS
-Visual: Visual learners will benefit from watching the other groups role play and from creating a list of conflicts on chart paper with their group.

-Auditory: Auditory learners will benefit from listening to the role play scenarios and from the class discussion to end the lesson.

-Kinesthetic: Kinesthetic learners will benefit from the movement involved in acting out their scenario. They would also benefit from being the scribe for their group.

-ESL: ESL students will benefit from working in the small group in case they have questions or need clarification. They would also benefit from writing out their script for the role play.

-At-risk: At -risk students would benefit from the constant interaction with their group and the class to help keep them engaged and on task .

-Advanced: Advanced learners could benefit from the lesson by assisting other students who are struggling with certain concepts in the lesson.

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