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ADHERENCE TO POLICY

Overview For Teachers

ADHERENCE TO POLICY: The ability to follow company rules, regulations, procedures, and directions especially those related to safety; display good workplace habits; keep assigned area neat and orderly; the ability to maintain equipment to ensure longevity and efficiency; determine causes of operating errors or equipment issues and decide what to do about it; take proactive measures to address unsafe practices or behaviors.

PURPOSE: Upon completion of this module, the student will understand the importance of following all rules and regulations in the workplace.

OBJECTIVES:

 Ability to recognize the importance of rules and procedures

 Ability to follow all rules and procedures

 Ability to take proactive measures to address unsafe practices or behaviors

OVERVIEW:

This module focuses on teaching students the importance of adherence to policy in the workplace. Students will work to improve these skills through activities and guided discussions with their class. They will discuss aspects of adherence to policy such as the importance of rules and procedures, why following directions is important, how the presentation of rules and procedures can make a difference, and what to do when they see someone else violating policies.

TEACHERS: WHAT ARE YOU OBSERVING?

What does Adherence to Policy look like in the classroom or in school in general? A great way to answer this and get things going is through engagement with the students. Ask your students these questions:

1. What does adherence to policy look like in school?

2. How does following the rules affect people around you? Example: teachers, classmates, etc.

3. What does adherence to policy look like within your learning?

RELEVANCY OF ADHERENCE TO POLICY:

Policies and procedures are an essential part of any organization; they provide a roadmap for day -to -day operations. They ensure compliance with laws and regulations, give guidance for decision -making, and streamline internal processes. They are put in place to keep employees safe as well as provide a better work environment.

LESSON:

Being the Boss Means Enforcing the Rules
Time Allocation: 20  minutes
Materials/Resources: whiteboard, markers, Role Playing Scenarios Worksheet , paper, pens/ pencils , computers/ tablets/ smartphones ( students - optional)


ANTICIPATORY SET IDEA:

 Ask students these questions for a quick opening discussion :

     o “Who wants to be a boss someday?”

     o “What are some challenges you may face as a boss or CEO of a company?”

     o “What types of rules do you need to create for your employees?”

WATCH THE VIDEO:


DIRECT INSTRUCTION:

 Tell students: a s an employee of a company, it’s important to not only know the rules and regulations but to also follow them. Rules are put in place to not only keep everything and everyone in order but to also protect the workers and the customers. But what if you aren’t just an employee of the company but rather, you are the boss – what’s your role when it comes to rules and regulations? You not only have to follow the rules but you also have to enforce them which isn’t always easy. Today in class, we are going to take a look at how important it is for managers/ supervisors to create fair and legitimate rules and regulations but to also enforce them with their employees.


GUIDED ACTIVITY:

 Put students into groups of 3 -4 and have them sit together in the classroom.

 Tell students that they need to designate one person in the group to be “the boss” and the others will be “employees .”

     o To make this easier, tell students that the tallest or shortest person in the group will be the boss.

 Give each student a scenario/ situation from the Role Playing Worksheet. Cut them out and give one to each group and also read the individual scenario out loud to each group.

 Inform students that they must come up with a role play in response to the scenario they received. Everyone in their group must be involved.

 Give groups a few minutes to put their role plays together and to practice them.

 When time is up, have each group present their role play to the class . Have a short discussion after each addressing how well the group responded to the scenario they were given and offer any constructive feedback.


CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING:

 Technology Use: Create a survey, poll, or questionnaire to send to the students that will give you immediate feedback about the student’s level of understanding (Survey Monkey, Google Forms, Edmodo, etc.).

 Non-Technology: Students will write down their response to the question in the Closing of the lesson on a piece of paper. When finished, they will hand it to you as they leave the classroom.

ETHICAL SCENARIO--Optional (if not using, skip  to "review and closing")

The Ethical Choice Scenarios have been developed to provide teachers with the ability to make the material applicable to real-life and relevant to the students. Within this guide, directions and prompts for the teacher will be in BLUE for ease of facilitation.

 

READ THE FOLLOWING SCENARIO OUT LOUD TO THE STUDENTS: 

TROUBLE IN SCIENCE CLASS

You are a Teacher’s Assistant during 4th period for your Science teacher. Science is your favorite subject so you love being able to help him and the other students with experiments they do in class. Your best friend also has the same Science teacher during 7 th period but Science is her worst subject. There are only a few weeks left of school before Winter Break and so there’s not much for you to do as a Teacher’s Assistant. You feel your phone vibrate in your back pocket and you pull it out to see that your best friend has texted you. She asked if you could do her a HUGE favor and change her grade in the gradebook for Science class. She knows that the Science teacher has complete trust in you so he never worries about you being sneaky or having to lock the grade book in the computer when he leaves the room. She tells you that if she doesn’t get at least a “C” in the class, she’s going to be ineligible for the spring softball season. What do you do? You know that accessing the gradebook, as well as changing grades, is completely against the rules but you don’t want your best friend to fail. Her heart is set on playing softball in college and this could ruin those chances for her, as well as your friendship.


ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: (display them to the class if necessary)

1. How many of you have already been faced with this scenario in real life?

2. What are the possible courses of action you could take?

3. What are possible positive or negative consequences for your best friend?

4. What are possible positive or negative consequences for you, depending on your decision?


GUIDED DISCUSSION: ASK STUDENTS TO SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS ON THE SITUATION AND HOW THEY ANSWERED THE QUESTIONS.

NOTE 1 : To help facilitate discussion, share any personal experiences you may have encountered with this same sort of issue.

NOTE 2 : Another option to foster further critical thinking is to then ask students , “ What values do you think are in tension here, why is it an ethical dilemma?”


CLOSING DISCUSSION: ASK THE STUDENTS, “IS BREAKING THE RULES OK IF NO ONE FINDS OUT ?”


REVIEW AND CLOSING:

 To end the lesson, have students respond to the following question either using a piece of paper.

     o Do you think it’s challenging for supervisors/ managers to enforce rules? Do you think they receive any pushback from their

        employees? If so, how should they handle it?

CORRELATION TO OBSERVATION TOOL: The Frequency Observation Tool (FOT) has a category where students will be observed and rated on their ability to adhere to rules and policies. This lesson will give students the opportunity to realize that not only do bosses have to create company rules, but they also have to enforce them, which isn’t always easy to do.


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION IDEAS:

-Visual: Visual learners will benefit from watching the role play scenarios.

-Auditory: Auditory learners will benefit from having the role playing scenario read to the group. They will also benefit from the group discussion and from listening to the other groups present.

-Kinesthetic: Kinesthetic learners will benefit from the movement involved in acting out their role play scenario to the class.

-ESL: ESL students would benefit from having a partner to assist them in the writing activity in case they have questions or need clarification.

-At-risk: At -risk students will benefit from the interaction they have with their group to help keep them focused and on task.

-Advanced: Advanced learners could benefit from helping other students write down their schedules, or by assisting ESL or At -risk students who may need additional help .

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